PREANESTHETIC MEDICATION IN CHILDREN: A COMPARATIVE STUDY AMONG INTRANASAL DEXMEDETOMIDINE, ORAL MIDAZOLAM AND ORAL CLONIDINE

Anamika Mishra, Yatendra Gupta, Rajeev Puri, Shailendra Chak, Trilok Chand

Abstract


The  aim  of  this  prospective  study  was  to  compare intranasal dexmedetomidine, oral clonidine & oral midazolam as premedicating agent on children undergoing surgeries under general anaesthesia. This study was conducted on 96 patients of ASA grade 1 & 2 of either sex between 2-12 years age undergoing routine surgeries. Patients are randomly allocated in 3 groups-M,C and D on basis of premedication given and were assessed on the basis of Preoperative degree of sedation and change in behavior, separation anxiety, effect of emergence agitation after surgery & adverse effects.

Sedation status at parental separation of children from group D were significantly different from group C & M. Emergence agitation scores of children from group C & D were significantly different from group M. Children between 2-5yr age showed statistically significant reduction in emergence agitation in group D. No statistically significant difference groupwise regarding  ease in separation of child from parents & post operative nausea vomiting (PONV) among 3 groups. So to conclude sedation and attenuation in emergence agitation was best with dexmedetomidine followed by clonidine and least with midazolam.



Keywords


Dexmedetomidine, Clonidine, Midazolam, Sedation, Parental Separation.

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References


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