EPIDEMIOLOGY OF PSUEDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN SURGICAL SITE INFECTION IN A REFFERAL HOSPITAL IN HYDERABAD, INDIA

Nabila Saher, Junaid Siddiqui

Abstract


BACKGROUND: The main objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of pseudomonas aeruginosa’s in the surgical site infection
patient and its susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics.
MATERIALS AND METHOD: During a period of 1 year, specimens were collected as the postoperative wound swabs in the microbiology
department, owaisi hospital and research centre, Hyderabad, India.
RESULT: Out of 100 samples collected, 30 samples were of p.aeruginosa, followed by 20 samples of E.coli, klebsiella sps 17 samples,
staphylococcus aureus 14 samples, proteus sps 6 samples, acinetobacter 3 samples, citrobacter freundii 1 sample, there was no growth in 9
specimens.
CONCLUSION: p.aeruginosa isolation was higher in male patients, in the age group of 21-40 years. The susceptibility pattern showed the
organism to be most commonly susceptible to imipenem, meropenem, cefoperazone/sulbactam, ticarcillin/clavulanate, and amikacin.


Keywords


Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, Surgical Site Infection, Prevalence, Nosocomial, Antibiotics.

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References


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