A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY TO ASSESS THE EFFECTS OF HEALTH EDUCATION ON MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH OF AN URBAN CITY OF CENTRAL INDIA

Jaya Patel, Shailesh Rai

Abstract


BACKGROUND: Education is a key determinant of fertility and infant health. Increasing girl's education decreases fertility rate, improves
maternal health and child health.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross Sectional study conducted on 500 women of age group 15-55 years having at least one child, from urban
area of Indore city. Written Informed consent was obtained from study participants. Data collected and analyzed with appropriate statistical test.
RESULTS: In present study we found only 15% of the women were graduate and above. 48% didn't use any contraceptive method. 74% do not
exercise. 88% have toilet facility at their home.60% use sanitary pads.65% had complete ANC visits, 90% consult a doctor for their children. 45%
of the children were supervised by their mother during study
CONCLUSION: From our study significant association was observed that women education is inversely proportional to no. of children, directly
proportional to ANC, child caring and her child's education.


Keywords


Children's Health, Education, Women

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References


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