INFORMAL SECTOR EMPLOYMENT IN THE MANUFACTURING SECTOR IN KERALA

Dr Deepa V D

Abstract


The manufacturing sector is one of the most important economic activities in Kerala. It partakes an enormous significance for the
development of the state. The objective of the paper is to analyse the informal manufacturing sector employment in Kerala,
especially focused on the women workers in the manufacturing of food processing sector. The informal sector provided as a larger
source of employment for women than for men in most of the countries. The major problem faced by the informal women
manufacturing sector in Kerala is the sale of the products, the demand of the producing products, their employment status, hours
of work and the availability of social security benefits provided by the government. In this study, the information is gathered from
both the primary and secondary data. The secondary data were collected from the NSSO unit level data based on the two rounds
viz 61st (2004-2005), and 68th (2011-2012). The primary data collected from the various information on 30 women workers in
the informal sector has been gathered from the extensive survey of field investigation. The analysis shows that the conditions of
female labour are facing many problems such as low wages, various health issues, lengthy working hours and social security
coverage etc. since a greater part of the proportion of socially and economically underprivileged sections of society are
concentrated in the informal economic activity, their proportion regarding wages, working conditions and social security is of
utmost importance for the development of any economy. Moreover, they empower themselves a lot to earn and sustain their
family and participate in various kinds of economic activities in Kerala.


Keywords


Informal Employment, Female Labour, Manufacturing Sector.

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